How I make my Christmas stockings…

vintage linen stocking

I have made my Christmas stockings the same way for years using a method that is kind of like a puzzle to me, at least to explain.  I’m going to give it my best shot :)  Here’s a photo of my very old notebook opened to my stocking making page.

I would be lost if this ever went missing

This method makes a fully lined stocking with a nice wide cuff.  There is also a layer of batting to give it some body which is great when you want to fill the stocking with little gifts.

The stocking pictured above is made with vintage linen, a muslin lining, 100% cotton batting and I decorated the cuff with silk ribbon embroidery and beading.  I encourage you to use the best materials you can, these are made to last, heirlooms.

What you’ll need:  stocking pattern, draw (yes, your own) out onto heavy paper in your desired size, mine is about 17″ long and 7″ wide.   Remember to include your seam allowance.

scissors, cotton thread, fabric for outside of stocking, muslin for lining, cotton batting and ribbon or other embellishments for a hanging loop.

First step, trace and cut out stocking front and back, next cut out 2 stocking lining using your muslin and lastly still using your stocking pattern cut out 2 cotton batting pieces.

Now to stack these in the correct order, this has to be done exactly this way or it won’t work!  First layer is the stocking front and back right sides together, on top of those put one batting piece, on top of the batting piece put the two lining pieces (right side together.  To finish place the last batting piece on top.

Pin all around to prevent shifting while sewing.

all layers pinned together

Next go over to your fabulous sewing machine and stitch all the way around, and of course leave the top of your stocking open :)  Because I’m a quilter I use my 1/4″ foot for just about everything but for this project I use the normal (5/8″?) foot to be sure to get all the layers sewn together.  I do check the seams when I’m done sewing to make sure I didn’t miss any of the layers due to shifting.

When you’re done sewing you need to cut out little notches all around the curves in the seam allowance to remove bulk.  Please avoid cutting through your stitches!

notching to remove bulk

Next step,with your hand go into the muslin lining pieces (or place your hand between the muslin lining pieces) and turn inside out.  So now there should be muslin on the outside, like the photo below.

lining side out

Now to cut out your cuff.  I measure across the top of the stocking, I double that ( cuff has to go all the way around, front and back) and I add two inches to this.  Seems like a lot but I’d rather have too much than come up short.  Then I measure down from the top of the stocking to where I want my cuff to end to get the depth of the cuff, I double this measurement.  So for my stocking I cut a piece of linen 18″ x 12″.  Fold this horizontally with WRONG sides together (right side out).  Pin the cuff around the stocking matching up the raw edges of the stocking (which is still lining side out linen on the inside) and the raw edges of the cuff.  Be sure when you are pinning that the inside of your stocking on both sides is the linen.  You’ll know what I mean when you are at this step, I have a hard time articulating this part :)

how cuff it looks when just sewn, be sure to line the seam end of the cuff with the heel side of the stocking

As you can see in the photo above, sew around the top of the stocking to attach cuff and then sew up the side seam to close the back of the cuff.  Now you can trim away excess fabric from the cuff seam.

Now the moment of truth!  Turn the whole stocking inside out and the outside should be your chosen fabric, mine is the linen.

stocking with the right side out and cuff yet to be turned down

Turn down your cuff, the photo below is another stocking I made with vintage lace sewn to the outside of the cuff.

cuff turned down

I press the stocking at this point and then attach my loop for hanging.  There’s a million ways to do this.  For one stocking I made a loop from the vintage linen.

there’s the hanging loop and look at that beautiful lining!

this hanging loop is made from antique lace trim and an antique pink glass button

I hope this was understandable, I just love making stockings this way and follow this method to make them in different sizes.  If there is anything you don’t understand please let me know and I will try my best to explain!

Till next time…

I’m sharing this tutorial at Little House in the Suburbs

Annemarie’s Haakblog

Freckled Laundry

Fresh Eggs Daily

Carter’s Cottage

No Minimalist Here

Comments

  1. So beautiful! I love your silk ribbon embroidery!

  2. What gorgeous stockings! You have inspired me! I am a new follower via Little House in the Suburbs. I would LOVE for you to come share at my weekly Farm Girl Blog Fest: http://fresh-eggs-daily.blogspot.com/2012/11/farm-girl-blog-fest-7.html

    Lisa
    Fresh Eggs Daily

  3. I loved your blog. You do wonderful work!

  4. Your stockings are lovely, Jayne. Adore the linen & vintage details. Your tutorial was wonderful. I’ve never ever made a Christmas stocking, but I want to this year so I will tuck your tutorial away. I was thinking of doing them straight (like a narrow bag with a hook…you’ve probably seen them before). I want them to look like a linen peppermint stick. ;) Blessings. Thank you for the nice note about my leaves.

    • Hi Jami,

      Thanks so much! I think a peppermint shaped stocking would be adorable. Think Ill break out of the traditional shape and try something new :)

  5. The stocking is simply beautiful and you did a very good tutorial. Thank you.
    Lillian
    lillianscupboard.wordpress.com

  6. Thank you for sharing over at Carter’s Cottage! I featured this tutorial in this weeks Monday Muse and I’ve love for you to link up again!
    Best~
    Christie

  7. Thank you! My sons who are all grown up now and still have the stocking I made for them :) I love those homemade fabric bags also, they come is handy and are so much nicer than paper!

  8. How wonderful that your sons still have their stockings. I agree, when I first told family members I was making bags they thought I’d lost it. Then when they saw the presents set out, I received plenty of remarks about how they looked so much nicer than the paper they wrapped with.

  9. I’m smiling as I read your comment, I love the part about your family thinking you lost it! I can relate, whenever someone comes over to visit and they see we use cloth napkins, no plastic etc they think we must be a little crazy. But I always get a compliment on how the linen napkin with their coffee makes the visit seem special :)

  10. It does feel like we care about our guests more when we give then a linen napkin. My grand kids love the cloth napkins, I’ve lost a couple when they informed me they didn’t have them at home and proceeded to choose a favorite to take home.

  11. You’ve got some very smart grand kids ;)

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